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September 19, 2008

Often the best way to teach someone something is to tell the story of how we first learned that same lesson.

<=> | September 19, 2008

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That is true! :-)

Posted by: Alexey | Sep 30, 2008 1:17:10 AM

I don't understand. Who are you? What are you trying to do with your blog?
I found your blog because someone pointed to a diagram of web-app-deployment that came from you and I went back to the root directory (here). This was a Chico State Student.

Your blog looks like a makeshift SEO effort. You're basically twittering here, while "people" are leaving one-line comments. It looks like it's all an SEO effort, not a genuine attempt to contribute anything to anyone.

Actually, I'm helping your page-rank by posting here (if you even allow this comment to go live), but if you do not defend your blog, while I'm accusing you of trying to game the system as your only real motive for even having this blog, to increase your page-rank or whatever, I'm going to blog about you and this domain, and all the "commenters" myself.

I simply can't stand seeing the web being used as a sleazy marketplace for empty, non-information. I especially can't stand it when it comes from someone who claims to be spreading wisdom of some sort.

On the other hand, if you'd like to set yourself straight, I'm totally open to having a discussion with you about ethics on the Web and what it is that you're doing, why it's not sustainable, and why it stands in the way of others who are trying to find real, useful information.

I'm serious. I really care about this stuff.

Andrew A. Peterson


Posted by: Andrew A. Peterson | Oct 10, 2008 5:15:18 AM

Thanks Andrew, I needed a good laugh this morning.

Posted by: Richard Dalton | Dec 30, 2008 2:45:28 PM

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